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Women’s heart attacks are more likely to result in death

Women are more likely to die from a heart attack than men, according to research presented by the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire at the Acute Cardiac Care Congress 2012. Women had longer treatment delays, more complications and also had less aggressive treatment, according to the research as reported in the Daily Mail.

The study suggests that women are more likely to die than men because they wait longer to call an ambulance and are not treated as effectively by doctors. As heart disease and heart attacks are more common in men, women and many doctors can make the mistake of thinking that women are not as likely to suffer from them and assume other causes.

Dr Guillaume Leurent from the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire warned, “Women may take longer to call an ambulance when they have chest pains because they don't believe it can be a myocardial infarction (heart attack). Most women believe myocardial infarction is a male problem."

Coupled with the recent news that the majority of women in the UK never discuss heart disease despite its status as the number one risk to their health, this finding should prompt more women to think about these potential risks to their health.

For many people, the first ‘symptom’ of cardiovascular disease is a heart attack.  If heart disease is diagnosed at the earliest possible stages, before symptoms develop, it can be successfully treated. Early warning signs can include; chest pains, sweating, shortness of breath, neck and jaw pain, upper back pain, fatigue, indigestion-like pain or nausea.

The Royal Brompton Hospital private patients’ centre has created a Heart Risk Clinic for women who wish to take steps to detect any possible concern at as early a stage as possible.  This heart screening service takes just over two hours and can help save lives by detecting the early signs of the disease.

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Women’s heart attacks are more likely to result in death
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