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New drug could act as cancer 'master switch'

Future cancer treatment could be made more effective by a new drug which acts as a master switch, shutting off cell growth in a range of tumours.

According to tests conducted at The Institute of Cancer Research, AT13148 - a type of kinase inhibitor - stops a variety of enzymes which allow tumours to grow and has been shown to kill cells in sarcoma, prostate and breast cancers.

Scientists also hope that this innovative treatment could eventually reduce the number of patients who become resistant to therapy.

"Using one master switch to turn off the different faulty messages forcing cancer cells to keep growing could be an effective way to destroy tumours," said Dr Julie Sharp, Cancer Research UK's senior science manager.

According to the charity, there are currently over 200 different types of cancer that have been identified - each with its own specific causes, symptoms and treatments. 

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New drug could act as cancer 'master switch'
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