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Symptoms, diagnosis and causes of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (mrsa)

Symptoms, diagnosis and causes of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (mrsa)

Symptoms, diagnosis and causes of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (mrsa)

Symptoms, diagnosis and causes of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (mrsa)

Tests and investigations

Incidence, age and sex

Incidence of MRSA infection is found to be around 3 to 4 in every 100 infection cases. It is not found to have any affinity with any particular sex, race or age.

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Signs and symptoms

Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus infection (MRSA) is contagious and is known to exhibit human-to-human spread. It may spread through the direct contact of the infected skin or through articles used by the infected person. It can be exhibited as boils which are pus-filled collections in the hair follicles. These boils may progress to pus-filled pockets beneath the skin, which are termed as abscesses. These abscesses, if left untreated, may become larger and open onto the skin surface and are called ‘carbuncles’. Some affected individuals may also exhibit a stye on the eyelid. Occasionally, the bacteria may spread to internal organs resulting in high-temperature, chills, joint pains and headache, depending upon the organ involved.

The diagnosis is established by biopsy or through culture of the infected skin lesion. Other test includes ‘StaphSR Assay’, which is a blood test to determine the genetic material of MRSA in the sample blood.

Causes and prevention

The cause of methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus infection (MRSA) is the occurrence of genetic mutation in the bacteria which happened after the introduction of methicillin medication in the early 60s. It may easily spread from person to person. Individuals with superficial wounds or cuts or with underlying infections are more prone to contract MRSA infection.

Prevention may be done by covering the cut or wound of the skin. It is essential to maintain one’s immunity and treat any underlying infections as soon as possible. It is advisable to avoid exposure to MRSA-infected persons. Keeping general cleanliness and maintaining good hygiene may help in preventing this infection.

Complications

Methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus infection (MRSA) if not treated immediately, may lead to endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves) or osteomyelitis (inflammation of the bones). It may also lead to sepsis (blood poisoning), which is a potentially life-threatening infection affecting the entire body.

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Get a quote for methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) treatment >

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