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Treatment of laryngeal papillomatosis (child)

Treatment of laryngeal papillomatosis (child)

Treatment of laryngeal papillomatosis (child)

Treatment of laryngeal papillomatosis (child)

No single drug has been shown to be uniformly successful in the treatment of RRP. Various antiviral drugs have been shown to have success in some individuals but all have their side effects. They include Acyclovir, Interferon-alpha, Ribavirin and Inosine Pranobex. The drug Cimetidine, usually used for indigestion has also recently been shown to be helpful in some severe cases.

In most cases the mainstay of treatment is surgical with removal of the papillomata from the airway via microlaryngoscopy. The most commonly used treatment is the carbon dioxide laser which vapourises the warts while doing minimal damage to underlying tissues but other lasers or removal methods are sometimes used in particular cases. The complications of laser surgery include scarring of the airway, unintended laser burns to tissues on the laser pathway and a very small risk of causing fire in the airway.

In some cases it is necessary to perform a tracheostomy because rapid regrowth of the papillomatas makes it impossible to keep the airway clear in any other way.

Outcomes

The principal problem with treating RRP is that like warts elsewhere, the papillomata tend to recur, patients may therefore require multiple treatments over the course of a number of years.

About 50% of patients recover eventually but relapse can occur many years later.

Submit a request for further information, a quotation or indicative cost. Your enquiry will be forwarded to up to 3 private healthcare providers. They will respond directly with further information.

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Treatment of laryngeal papillomatosis (child)

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