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Hair loss could soon be a thing of the past

Hair loss and bald patches have plagued mankind for centuries but now scientists are close to ending this distressing problem following a stem cell breakthrough.

Scientists from Berlin have managed to grow the world’s first artificial hair follicles by using animal stem cells.

Although the hair grown was somewhat thinner than normal, experts are confident that this technique can be used to help hair loss sufferers grow new hair from their own stem cells and have it implanted in any bald or thinning spots of hair.

This pioneering new research could mean that hairless celebrities such as Harry Hill and football legend Sir Bobby Charlton could soon sport a full bodied and flowing mane of hair.

For many men hair loss can be a distressing time causing feelings of depression and anxiety. Often hereditary, thinning hair and baldness and can start as early as the teenage years but most commonly starts to affects men in their 30s.

For those looking to gain a fuller head of hair, The Hospital Group offers pioneering new hair transplant procedures in state-of-the-art facilities.

A leading hair transplant surgeon at The Hospital Group said: “For many men and women, losing their hair can be a highly worrying and upsetting time. They feel a strong sense of panic when they see that their hair is thinning and worry about the way they look.

“Hair loss can significantly reduce a person’s confidence and affect their daily lives. At The Hospital Group we offer hair transplant surgery which can change a person’s life for the better and achieve outstanding results that give a fuller head of hair and the patient their confidence back.”

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Hair loss could soon be a thing of the past
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