Fertility 'can be altered by food'

Young women who have had successful cancer treatment want more information to be available to them about the potential risks to their future fertility.

A study published in Springer's Journal of Cancer Survivorship found that as treatment improves and more adolescents and young people of a child bearing-age are surviving the disease, the issue of fertility is becoming a significant one.

According to the research, cancer survivors are less likely to have children than people of the same age who have never had the illness.
Scientists found that women wanted more control over their fertility and better continuity of care.

"These young women would benefit from improved information regarding their options, through discussions initiated by their healthcare providers," said the author of the report Jessica Gorman.

Macmillan states that each of the main types of cancer treatment - chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery and hormonal therapy - all affect fertility in different ways.

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Fertility 'can be altered by food'
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